Skip to main content

Natural Awakenings Washington DC Metro

The Silent Cause of Chronic Inflammation

Dec 04, 2013 02:00AM

Food sensitivities are one of the leading causes of chronic inflammation and a huge obstacle to cure. The food we consume is meant to nourish the cells of our body and boost their function. The better we eat, the better our organs perform their role. We are exposed to over 500 chemicals each day, not including those found in food. The most important thing we can do is eat the right food, that does not cause chronic inflammation, but that which purifies and detoxifies.

Food sensitivities are not as immediate or obvious as those of food allergies. It may take up to three days for your body to react to a food consumed. This is known as delayed sensitivity and is almost impossible to detect without sophisticated testing. Look for a blood lab test that applies the ELISA method and measures both IgG and IgE antibodies, as opposed to the conventional skin-prick tests, which identify IgE antibodies only.

Symptoms commonly associated with food sensitivities include gas, bloating, indigestion, diarrhea, constipation, joint pain, asthma, acne, fatigue, brain fog, migraines, hyperactivity, anxiety and difficulty losing weight. Although a runny nose, dry eyes and sinus congestion are all signs of seasonal hay fever, if these symptoms persist all year, you may be dealing with hidden food sensitivity. All of these symptoms are caused by chronic inflammation, the gateway to disease, and true healing cannot take place.

Mother nature’s four seasons intend for us to be seasonal eaters. Consuming the same food every day will likely cause you to develop a sensitivity. Avoid the top food sensitivities—gluten, dairy, corn, soy, nuts, nightshades, citrus and yeast for six weeks and monitor the difference in how you feel. When realizing what food sensitivities you have and avoiding them, you will experience a positive change in the way you look and feel.

Dr. Isabel Sharkar is a licensed naturopathic physician and co-owner of Indigo Integrative Medical Clinic in Georgetown. 

 

 

Global Brief
Health Brief