Skip to main content

Natural Awakenings Washington DC Metro

Letter From the Publisher

Mar 27, 2015 07:57PM
Dear Friends,

There is a great Dar Williams song that resonates with me – When I Was a Boy. It’s a wonderful series of vignettes in a song that pays homage to those of us lovingly called “tom-boys” back in the day. We were the girls who climbed trees and jumped on rocks. I had a Barbie, but she hung out with my brother’s G.I. Joe.

The best part of not caring if my shoes got muddy or worrying if my hair was combed, was that it left space for adventures of my own making. I spent formative summers as a young girl up at my grandparent’s place at Crow Lake in Ontario. My grandfather was a high school math teacher but he and my grandmother also owned, built and ran summer cottages on the most beautiful little fishing lake. Sometimes my brothers, one older and one younger, would be up there with me and sometimes other children would spend a week at one of the five cottages, but more likely, I was on my own to figure out what to do each day.

After chores (including tending the garden, pumping water and doing laundry through a wringer washer), I was free to explore the pine woods, the rock point and the lake. I caught frogs and fish. I knew all the best trees to climb and had a secret route up the top of the steep rock point. There was no point in staying inside when there was a great big world to discover outside.

Our feature article this month on learning from nature’s wisdom by Christine MacDonald confirms the experiences that I, and so many others, have had. The connection to the natural world is vital to our own health and for the entire human race. We learn from our insect and bird friends about creating a sustainable habitat. The medical establishment is starting to understand the value of stepping back into the woods and some doctors are prescribing hiking and connecting with nature for desk-bound patients.

As the weather is warming, there are no more excuses to get out there and take advantage of the wonderful outdoor spaces in the city and beyond. We are blessed with some of the area’s best biking and hiking trails. In only a few hours, you can be at the bay and out on the water. Or if you are more inclined to watch things grow, now is the time to plant some seeds or better yet, forage for healthy wild food. Teresa Boardwine tells us how this month.

With the million plus visitors descending upon the city to witness the burst of cherry-blossoms, isn’t it a good time to escape to the woods and the wild and to reconnect with nature. See you on the trail.

Peace

 

Global Brief
Health Brief